Second edition of Too Much Wrong: A report into the death of Eddie Murray

25 November 1999

Second edition of Too Much Wrong:
A report into the death of Eddie Murray

Published by the NSW Many Rivers Aboriginal Legal Service

The launch, at which Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Social Justice Commissioner Dr Bill Jonas will speak, is being hosted by the Human Rights Commission.

When: 2pm, Friday 26 November 1999
Where: Human Rights Commission, Level 8 Hearing Room, 133 Castlereagh Street, Sydney

Background

On 12 June 1981, Eddie Murray, a 21-year-old Aboriginal footballer, was taken into police custody in Wee Waa at around 2pm. By 3.30pm, he was dead. An initial autopsy shortly after his death failed to identify all injuries sustained to his body and was later described by expert pathologists as unreliable. Subsequent police inquests neglected to call key witnesses to give evidence.

Eddie Murray's death was one of the first cases to be investigated by the Royal Commission into Black Deaths in Custody in 1988. The 1st Edition of Too Much Wrong - A Report into the Death of Eddie Murray was released in 1997.

The report was critical of the way in which the Royal Commission was conducted and recommended that the body be exhumed for further investigation. A second autopsy found significant injury to the sternum.

Acting for the Murray family, Barrister Robert Cavanagh says that had this injury been identified, more investigation and the calling of further witnesses would have occurred.

In releasing this updated report, Mr Cavanagh said, "We want further medical experts to examine the injury and its possible causes. We are also calling for further analysis of the evidence taken at the Inquests and Royal Commission Hearings, and further questioning of witnesses as appropriate".

Eddie's parents, Leila and Arthur Murray, Robert Cavanagh, Social Justice Commissioner Bill Jonas and Human Rights Commissioner Chris Sidoti will be present at the launch.

For further information please call Jackie Randles on (02) 9284 9880 or 0419 258 597.

Last updated 2 December 2001.