Date: 
Wednesday 9 August 2017

Time’s running out to get your nomination in for the 2017 Human Rights Awards, with nominations closing next week.

We all know someone, or perhaps a business or organisation, that deserves to be recognised for their inspiring work; for their devotion to making Australia a better place and their commitment to ensuring our rights and freedoms are enjoyed by all, on an equal basis.

Previous winners in the prestigious Human Rights Medal category include Pat Anderson, Peter Greste, Eddie Mabo, Rt Hon Malcolm Fraser, Ian Thorpe, Jeremy Jones, Professor Fred Hollows, Sister Clare Condon and Dorothy Hoddinott.

On August 14, nominations close for all eight Awards categories:

• Human Rights Medal
• Young People’s Human Rights Medal
• Business Award
• Racism. It Stops With Me Award
• Media Award
• Tony Fitzgerald Memorial Community Individual Award
• Community Organisation Award
• Law Award

Hurry to make sure those who deserve to be recognised, are recognised. Details and nomination forms are online at http://hrawards.humanrights.gov.au

Eligibility

To be eligible for nomination, applicants must be an Australian Citizen or have Australian permanent residency as at the date of nomination.
If you wish to apply for more than one award category, an individual application form for each award category must be submitted.

Entrants must have made a significant contribution to the promotion and protection of human rights IN AUSTRALIA and been active in this area between August 2016 and August 2017.

Examples could include:

• taking action to overcome discrimination or infringements of human rights within Australia
• encouraging greater social harmony within Australia in a range of areas such as race relations, gender equality and the treatment of children and young people
• enhancing the rights of Indigenous Australians
• promoting equal opportunity for people with a disability in Australia or countering discrimination on the basis of age or sexuality
• increasing awareness of issues of injustice or inequality in Australia