Skip to main content

Gender Diversity

Standing with young LGBTI Australians

The Australian Human Rights Commission celebrates Wear it Purple Day in support of young lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people.

Wear it Purple was founded in Australian in 2010 in response to international reports of young people taking their lives following bullying and harassment. Since that time, the last Friday in August has evolved from a day mourning loss to one celebrating inclusion and diversity.

Project explores rights of Australians born with variations in sex characteristics

The Australian Human Rights Commission is examining how best to protect the human rights of people born with variations in sex characteristics.

The project will learn about the experiences of people born with bodies that do not meet the medical or social norms of male or female bodies and the impact of medical interventions on their wellbeing.

Currently, there are no national guidelines or legislation on the management of people born with variations in sex characteristics in Australia.

Mardi Gras celebrates commitment to equality

The 40th anniversary of the Sydney Gay and Lesbian Mardi Gras was a magnificent celebration of pride, diversity and unswerving commitment to equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex (LGBTI) people, said Human Rights Commissioner Edward Santow.

“Marriage equality was colourfully celebrated during this year’s Mardi Gras parade. Our history gives us hope that we can now come together to respect and honour the wonderful diversity of our community,” Commissioner Santow said.

Keynote Address - Military Pride Ball 2017

Military Pride Ball - Keynote Speech 

Check against delivery

Introduction
Acknowledgements

• Thank you, James and Ellen, for your kind introduction.

• Traditional owners: the Gadigal People of the Eora Nation and to pay my respects to their elders past and present.

• The many members of the LGBTI community who have served in the armed forces – as well as those from inside and outside the LGBTI community who helped make this possible.

Human rights for LGBTI people: still much to do

The Australian Human Rights Commission acknowledges International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia (IDAHOBIT) on 17 May 2017.

“International Day Against Homophobia, Biphobia and Transphobia is an important opportunity to reflect on the progress made nationally and globally to reduce violence, harassment, stigma and discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and intersex people,” said Human Rights Commissioner Edward Santow.

“The day also reminds us how much there is still to do,” Commissioner Santow said.

Human rights for trans and gender diverse people

Transgender Day of Visibility (TDOV) on 31March is a day to recognise and celebrate trans and gender diverse people in our communities.

The Australian Human Rights Commission calls on all governments and communities to work together to overcome the barriers which prevent trans and gender diverse people from fully realising and enjoying their human rights.

In 2013, the Australian Government introduced important nationwide protections against discrimination on the basis of gender identity into federal anti-discrimination law.

Trans, Gender Diverse & Intersex Participation in Australian Sports

Different coloured tennis shoes

In 2015, former Human Rights Commissioner, Tim Wilson, announced a national survey on the participation of transgender, gender diverse and intersex people in sport to ensure their rights are protected in the policies and practices of sporting codes.

The results of the national survey informed the National Anti-Homophobia and Inclusion Framework to ensure it suitably protects people on the basis of gender identity or intersex status.

SOGI's Story

LGBTI people in Africa are frequently subjected to extreme violence and discrimination, based purely on their sexual orientation and identity. Today, the Australian Human Rights Commission will launch an educational resource pack which has been developed with and for African national human rights institutions, civil society organisations and local community groups to encourage learning and awareness of sexual orientation, gender identity and intersex status (SOGII).

Sex and gender diversity issues paper

The Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission (HREOC) is seeking the views of the sex and gender diverse community about the most pressing human rights issues faced by people who are transgender, transsexual or intersex. HREOC also seeks input into how it might assist in promoting and protecting the human rights of people who are sex and gender diverse.