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Paid Maternity Leave and Pregnancy

Discrimination Sex Discrimination
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Children with their mothers

Paid Parental Leave and Pregnancy

 

2010

2009

2008

 

Oral submission by Commissioner Elizabeth Broderick - 20 May 2008.

Federal Sex Discrimination Commissioner Elizabeth Broderick outlined the Commission's model for a national paid leave scheme for parents in her opening statement to the Productivity Commission Inquiry into Paid Maternity, Paternity and Parental Leave.


2007It's About Time (2007)

The women, men, work and family project was launched by former Sex Discrimination Commissioner Pru Goward in 2005. It builds on the the Commission's previous work on paid maternity leave and examines the relationship between family responsibilities and paid work.


2005

As part of the project examining family responsibilities and paid work, the Commission released a discussion paper in June 2005.

 


A Time to Value - Proposal for a National Paid Maternity Leave Scheme (2002)

Time to Value - Proposal for a National Paid MaLogo: A Time to Value - Proposal for a National Paid Maternity Leave Schemeternity Leave Scheme proposes a national scheme of paid maternity leave, entirely government funded, available to women in paid work at the time of the birth of a child. Women who have been in paid work for 40 of the 52 weeks before the birth oftheir child, including small business women, contractors and other self-employed, casual and part time workers, would be eligible.


Valuing Parenthood: Options for paid maternity leave - Interim paper 2002

Valuing Parenthood: Options for paid maternity leave - Interim paper 2002 proposes options for implementing a national paid maternity leave scheme, examines provisions in Australia compared to other countries and canvasses the arguments for a national scheme.


Pregnant and Productive: It's a right not a privilege to work while pregnant

Pregnant and Productive: It's a right not a privilege to work while pregnant presents the findings of an extensive inquiry conducted by the Commission. It highlights that discrimination on the basis of pregnancy and the inability to obtain paid maternity leave are significant factors contributing to Australian women and their partners deciding to not have children or to limit the size of their families. This report details pregnancy discrimination in the workplace and makes recommendations to address these inequities.

Also available:


Pregnancy Guidelines 2001

The Pregnancy Guidelines 2001 help clarify many of the issues surrounding pregnancy and work. The intersection of anti-discrimination, industrial and occupational health and safety laws can be complex and confusing. The Guidelines aim to help employers and employees better understand and meet the existing requirements.