South Australian Film Corporation

DDA Action Plan

Prepared by

Disability Consultancy Services Pty Ltd

December 2000

Contents

Page

1.      PREAMBLE                                                                1         

1.1.  DDA Action Plan Development Process

2.   INTRODUCTION                                                      2

2.1.  South Australian Film Corporation

2.2.  SAFC Site

2.3.  Staff

2.4.  Budget

3.  DISABILITY DISCRIMINATION ACT (DDA) 1992                            4

3.1.  Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 1992

3.2.  DDA Objective

3.3.  DDA Definition of Disability

3.4.    DDA Discrimination

3.5.  DDA Complaints

3.6.  DDA Standards

3.7.    ABS Disability Demographics

4.  Building Review                                                                                 6

4.1  Methodology

5.  RESULTS OF BUILDING REVIEW                                                         7

5.1.    Carparking

5.2.  Entrances

5.3.  Staircases

5.4.  Toilets

5.5.  Theatres

5.6.    Other Facilities

6.          CONCLUSION                                                        13

7.          SCHEDULE OF WORK                                        14


1. PREAMBLE

 

The South Australian Film Corporation is pleased to lodge this document with the Human Rights & Equal Opportunity Commission in accordance with the requirements of the Federal Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 1992.

SAFC is also pleased to forward a copy of its DDA Action Plan to the Minister for the Arts.  This responds to the Minister's request for all organisations in receipt of triennial or annual funding through Arts SA to develop a Disability Action Plan, as set out in the document ARTS + 2000 - 2005.

This DDA Action Plan will also be used as a method of informing staff of the SAFC undertakings.  It will become part of the induction education process for new staff members and will serve as part of SAFC's public accountability commitment.

Times New Roman 12 point type has been chosen for this document to assist readers with vision impairments.

1.1.  DDA Action Plan Development Process

In November 2000 the SAFC appointed Disability Consultancy Services (DCS) Pty Ltd to assist with the process of developing its DDA Action Plan.  The task for DCS was to:

•          review SAFC facilities and services to identify barriers to the equitable use of the organisations facilities and services by people with disabilities;

•          in conjunction with SAFC staff develop strategies and timetable for the removal or alleviation of those identified barriers;

•          provide "disability awareness" training to SAFC staff;

•          prepare for approval  a draft DDA Action Plan.


2.  INTRODUCTION

 

2.1.  South Australian Film Corporation

The South Australian Film Corporation was established under the South Australian Film Corporation Act 1972, to stimulate and encourage the formation and continued development of a film industry in South Australia.  

The Corporation through its Board of Directors is subject to the general control and direction of the Minister for the Arts.

The SAFC is accountable to the Government to:

•          Make available advice and financial assistance for the development and production of films with an appeal to a diversity of audiences;

•          Promote the South Australian film industry and the state as a place to make films;

•          Contribute to the continuity and replenishment of creative and technical skills within the South Australian Film industry;

•          Support film as a medium for entertainment, education and innovative experimentation through South Australian organisations established for that purpose;

•          Operate in a cost-efficient manner, solely or in association with the private sector, such facilities considered essential to sustaining the South Australian Film industry as would otherwise not be available;

•          Provide management services for the Government of South Australia in respect of its films and other multi-media needs.

The SAFC has a proud reputation of producing and being associated with many films achieving world-wide acclaim.  It has also been associated with a number of films depicting issues associated with disability and which have employed and starred actors with personal experience of disability.  Examples are;

•          Dance Me to My Song;

•          Bad Boy Bubby;

•          Push Start; and

•          Shine.

2.2.  SAFC Site

The South Australian Film Corporation is located off Tapleys Hill Road, at 3 Butler Drive, Hendon, South Australia within an industrial estate, first established to assist in World War 11 manufacturing requirements.

The leased SAFC site within the Hendon Common Estate, is bounded by Butler Drive on the northern side, Lumiere Lane on the west and Whitworth Lane on the eastern side.  The large warehouse type building is old and the interior itself resembles a film set.

The building's age is making it increasingly difficult to maintain and immediate upgrading processes to improve access should be viewed in the light of the building condition and future plans for SAFC accommodation.

2.3.  Staff

The SAFC during the year 2000 has operated with a full time equivalent staff of approximately 20 employees.

During the development process of this DDA Action Plan, all SAFC staff were offered a two-hour Disability Awareness program.  The session involved; information about the DDA, preferred disability language and a simulated disability awareness exercise, as well as information on appropriate ways to offer assistance to people with disabilities.

2.4.  Budget

The SAFC during 1999 / 2000 received some $5.3m from State Government grants and other sources.


3.  DISABILITY DISCRIMINATION ACT (DDA) 1992

 

3.1.  Disability Discrimination Act (DDA) 1992

In the past, people with disabilities have been seen as separate from mainstream society, needing special and separate services.  As a legacy of these attitudes, our laws and organisations have also often overlooked the need to provide people with disabilities with the same level of access to facilities, services and standards as other community members.

In October 1992, the Federal Government passed the Disability Discrimination Act (DDA). The Act was proclaimed on March 1 1993, making discrimination on the basis of disability unlawful in a number of areas of public life including employment, education, access to premises used by the public and the provision of goods and services. The DDA holds precedence over other federal, state and territory legislation unless exempted in writing by the Federal Attorney General. (See DDA Section 3)

 
3.2.  DDA Objective

The main objective of the Act, is to eliminate as far as possible discrimination against persons on the grounds of disability. It is designed to ensure that people with disabilities are not deprived of equal opportunity by stereotype, prejudice or misconception, or by unnecessary barriers or restrictions.

The Act requires that a person’s disability should be taken into account only where it is relevant and fair to do so. (See DDA Section 3)

3.3.  DDA Definition of Disability

The DDA definition of disability is broad and includes the categories of physical, sensory, intellectual, learning and psychiatric disability. The definition also defines disability as:

•          total or partial loss of bodily or mental functions;

•          loss of body parts;

•          presence of organisms capable of causing disease or illness including  HIV / AIDS;

•          malfunction, malformation or disfigurement of the body;

•          disorders or malfunctions which result in a person learning differently; or

•          disorders illnesses or diseases which affect a person’s thought processes, reality perceptions, emotions, judgements, or which result in disturbed behaviour.

The DDA disability definition also includes disability that exists, previously existed, may exist in the future, or is imputed to a person.  (see DDA  Section 4)

3.4.  DDA Discrimination

The Act covers potential as well as actual, and direct as well as indirect discrimination.  An example of direct discrimination would be treating a person with a disability less favourably than others. Indirect discrimination occurs if a service provider set particular conditions on users with disabilities, which were more onerous than for others. (See DDA Sections 5 & 6)

3.5.  DDA Complaints

Although a conciliatory approach is taken in the resolution of complaints, the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission (HREOC) has the authority to order compensation. Where an organisation has developed and lodged a DDA Action Plan with HREOC, that Plan will be taken into account when dealing with a complaint. (See DDA Sections 60 & 61)

3.6.  DDA Standards

Section 31 of the Act enables the Minister to formulate standards.  The purpose of disability standards is to clarify the rights and obligations of the members of the community to facilitate compliance with the DDA. Standards are issued by HREOC in the form of Advisory Notes. Although these Advisory Notes provide guidance to best practice, compliance does not guarantee against a complaint. In January 2000 Advisory Notes had been issued on Education, Access to Premises, Employment, Access to the World Wide Web, Insurance and Superannuation.

The Australian Building Codes Board (ABCB) has undertaken a project to upgrade and amend the BCA to better reflect equitable and dignified access to new buildings and clarify matters for authorising bodies.

3.7.  ABS Disability Demographics

The ABS 1998 Disability, Ageing and Carers; Summary of Findings states that 22.4% of the South Australian population are people with disability, which is higher than the general Australian population of 19.3%.  ABS found that 78% of all people with a disability, have a physical disability as their main condition. Of these people, 29% have a profound disability requiring supported assistance for most functional activity.   When families, carers and associates are added to disability data, the impact of disability within South Australia is even more widely felt.


4.  Building Review

 

The DDA Building Review by DCS was undertaken in November 2000.  The DDA review of SAFC services showed them to be free of discriminatory practices.


4.1  Methodology

The Building Review involved a physical inspection of the premises, measuring and noting essential door widths and other measurements significant for the access of people with disabilities.  Measuring instruments used included a measuring tape, an inclinometer and Newton guage.

Recommendations have been made within the context of the building's age, purpose and possible future SAFC relocation to another site.   Members of the general public rarely use the building and people with severe disabilities have successfully used the building in the past, as both members of the public, actors and production team personnel.

Recommendations should be carried out in accordance with:

•          Building Code of Australia current requirements;

•          Australian Standards AS1428.1 - 1998 or the most recent code of the time; and

•          Australian Standards AS1428.4 (requirements for tactile ground surface indicators)

Priorities are based on a 5 year time scale:

2001-2002 - HIGH

2003-2004 - MEDIUM

2005-2006 - LOW.

Risk assessment is based on modified versions of AS/NZ AS/NZ 4360 - 1999.

All measurements are approximate and should be used only as guides.  Future modifications should incorporate:

•          Door widths with a minimum clear width opening of 860mm

•          Require low level door opening force

•          Door handles of a lever type and placed between 900-1100mm

•          Control switches and security swipes mounted between 900-1100mm. Control systems where appropriate should also be at right angles and 1m from door openings to allow access for those using a wheelchair or scooter.

•          Accessible toilet facilities and fixtures in accordance with AS1428.1 - 1998.

Recommendations are noted as dot points and also appear in a Schedule of Works (Attachment A).

5.  RESULTS OF BUILDING REVIEW

 

5.1.  Carparking

The SAFC site offers choices of three inset on-street parks on Butler Drive, twenty spaces for staff and visitor parking on the western side of Lumiere Lane and a large unmarked asphalt park for 50+ vehicles and trucks on the south-east corner of the site off Whitworth Lane.  There are no signed disability carparks.

Recommendations

•          Provide raised and ground-signed disability parking bay (3.2m wide) at the first northern end position of the western Lumiere Lane carparking area.

5.2.  Entrances

Main Northern Entrance- Butler Drive

The main northern entrance on Butler Drive has a crossover water table with a 1:5 gradient leading to a ramped 1:20 gradient brick paved undercover approach.

A call button 1500mm high and security card swipe control are placed between 1300-1400mm on the eastern edge of the main entrance doors. A closed circuit video system monitors this entrance, which is also visible from the receptionist desk.

Double inward opening entrance doors each with 820mm clear width, handles at 1110-1540mm.  There is a 6mm lip at the entrance and the doors require a 70N pressure for opening. 

The internal security control is 1350mm high. Both security and the call button are above the common reach zone of 900-1100mm, as required by AS1428.1-1998. The controls should also be at least 1m away from and at right angles to the entrance wall.

Because the entrance door is visible from the reception counter, which is also monitored, security controls are not seen as a major barrier.  However, a possible solution could be to mount the control systems at an accessible height on a post adjacent to the pathway to facilitate after hours access.

Recommendations

•          Reduce pressure required to open main entrance door

•          In the long term, re-design the main entrance and provide level access path to link with the visitor carpark disability bay.  A new level entrance should include accessible after hour and security control systems, pole mounted a metre from entrance and at a height between 900 - 1100mm.

North-eastern Entrance - Butler Drive

The north-eastern entrance on Butler Drive has a crossover water table of 1:6 gradient.  Double entrance doors have each inward opening leaf 850mm clear width, handles 1050-1400mm, security swipe card control 1320-1420mm and intercom at 1500mm.

Recommendations

•          Pole mount security controls 1m from entrance at a height between 900 - 1100mm.

North-western Entrance - Lumiere Lane

The portico north-western entrance off Lumiere Lane has twin double doors opening inward from the brick paved area leading to the Kookaburra Cafe. Each leaf has a 770mm clear width, door handles are from 830-1050mm.  Lumiere Lane kerb is between 80-120mm high and there is no kerb ramp.  Security controls are at 1350- 1450mm.

Adjacent is a fire exit door with level access and handle at 1100mm. Exit doors open outwards.

Recommendations

•          Provide kerb ramp access to portico brick paved entrance area.

•          Pole mount security controls 1m from entrance at a height between 900 - 1100mm.

South-western Entrance - Lumiere Lane

The south-western entrance has covered entrance with double leaf doors 720mm wide and security controls at 1350-1450mm.  A kerb ramp has been provided.

Recommendations

•          Pole mount security controls 1m from entrance at a height between 900 - 1100mm.

South-eastern Rear Entrance

The south-eastern covered entrance has an 850mm width single door with a 25mm sill step and handle at 1050mm.

Recommendations

•          Provide level entrance

North-eastern Rear Entrance

The north-eastern level rear entrance has double outward opening doors with each leaf at 970mm. Door handles are at 1160mm, call button 1500mm, security controls 1300-1400mm. Close circuit TV monitoring of this entrance is provided.

As this is an alternative after-hours entrance, problems of access to security and other control systems are not considered essential on this monitored entrance. Access issues for this entry would only concern staff members with disability, in which case the alternatives can be dealt with through management decisions.

Recommendations

•          Develop management processes for alternative access procedures

Sound Stage 1 & 2 Entrances

The 3.5m wide Sound Stage roller doors open out to the rear carpark and are level. Adjacent are two outward opening access doors 850mm wide with 35mm sill steps and handles at 1m.

5.3.  Staircases

There are four sets of stairs within the building leading to mezzanine floor levels.  Two are original to the building and the other two of more recent construction. There are no tactile indicators at any stairways.

There is no access to the mezzanine office level for those people unable to negotiate stairs.  As alternative office and meeting accommodation is available on the ground floor, it is possible to make adjustments in the short term.

Recommendations

•          Develop management policy for providing alternative office and meeting accommodation when required by users with mobility impairments.

•          Provide tactile ground surface indicators (TGSIs) at the entrance and landings of all staircases.

•          Ensure all stair steps have firm contrasted step nosings

•          Provide second handrail where necessary

•          Improve stair lighting.

Red Staircase Central Passageway

The central stairs to the mezzanine office area is 1400mm wide stair leading from the central passage with two rises of 9 carpeted 160mm steps with uncontrasted nosings.  Double side handrails at 930mm are provided.

Eastern Staircase

The eastern end of the building has an original set of concrete carpeted two-stage stairs (thirteen steps, then four) with 160mm step risers and step widths of 230mm.

Stairs have a single rail only at 950mm and no contrasted nosings.

This steep staircase has a reputation for being hazardous because of the carpeting and narrow step width.

Recommendations

•          Provide firm contrasted nosings

•          Provide a second handrail

•          Improve lighting

Western Staircase

The western end of the building has an original set of concrete carpeted two-stage stairs (thirteen steps, then four) with 160mm step risers and step widths of 230mm.

Stairs have a single rail only at 950mm and no contrasted nosings.

This steep staircase has a reputation for being hazardous because of the carpeting and narrow step width.

Recommendations

•          Provide firm contrasted step nosings

•          Provide a second handrail

•          Improve lighting

Edit Area Stairs

This is a more recently-made wooden staircase leading to a mezzanine storeroom. The stairs are very steep, only 550mm wide and have open risers with step height at 200mm and step lengths 215mm. A handrail at 1m is provided on the balustrade side only and there are no contrasting nosings.

There are a number of issues relating to occupational health and safety associated with carrying packages on this steep set of narrow stairs which do not comply with Building Code requirements. Recommendations deal only with the most practical improvement.

Recommendations

•          Provide contrasting step nosings

5.4.  Toilets

The building has ground floor eastern and western male/female toilets adjacent to the original staircase areas.

North-eastern Male Toilet

This toilet has two showers and three standard cubicles with 560mm door width. The entrance door is 860mm with a 20mm sill step with a swing force of 65N.

Recommendations

•          Contrast step nosings at entrance

•          Provide grab rail in first toilet cubicle

•          Reduce swing force on entry door

North-eastern Female Toilet

The female toilet has three showers and seven standard cubicles with 560mm door width. The entrance door is 780mm wide with a 55mm step. Doorknob is at 1050mm.  The door swing force is 65N.

Recommendations

•          Contrast step nosings at entrance

•          Provide grab rail in first toilet cubicle

•          Reduce swing force on entry door

North-western Male Toilet

This toilet adjacent to the western staircase has three cubicles and a stainless steel urinal. Double airlock doors 770mm wide have an entry sill step 30mm high.

Recommendations

•          Contrast step nosings at entrance

•          Reduce swing force on entry doors

North-western Female Toilet

This toilet situated adjacent to the western staircase has a large, separate sickroom facility and five cubicles. The entrance door 800mm wide, requiring a 50N swing force. This is the only toilet in the building with no entrance step and the rest room provides an opportunity for the provision of a unisex accessible facility.

Recommendations

•          Provide unisex accessible facility in current rest room

•          An alternative rest room within current vacant areas would need to be provided if current room is converted into a unisex toilet

•          Reduce swing force on entry door

5.5.  Theatres

The theatres all have raised artificial floors in order to provide easy and continuous access to cabling systems for technical equipment.

Theatre 1

Theatre 1 is used to screen films to a small technical group and master film sound tracks. The western entrance has a carpeted lounge area with two carpeted steps 150mm high and no contrasted nosings, leading into the theatre proper. A portable ramp is available to assist wheelchair users to access Theatre 1 level when required.

A second northern entrance has a small flight of 5 carpeted steps.  A further three steps each with a 200mm rise lead to the platform viewing area behind the Harrison Desk.  The inside exit doors carry a large "watch your step" warning sign. 

Theatre 2

The carpeted Theatre 2 is used as a TV mixing area. Entrance door is 760mm wide and opens outward with a 90mm carpeted step. Controls are set at 1350mm

Adjacent is a projection room which has two rises of three and five steps with 180mm risers and contrasted step nosings. A handrail at 1100mm is provided on one side of steps.

It is probably not affordable or necessary to make modifications in this small area for total disability access.

•          Provide alternative arrangements if necessary.

Theatre 3

This small carpeted theatre is used for post-sync work. Entrance door is 980mm wide opening inwards with a doorknob at 1100mm. There are two internal carpeted steps with 150mm and 130mm risers and contrasted step nosings.

Sound Stages

These are large cement floored areas used for internal film sets, orchestral recording and occasional functions. Both sound stages have large roll-up level entry doors from the rear truck park.

The internal entrance doors open inward with a 780mm clear width and doorknobs at 760mm.

5.6.  Other Facilities

Reception area

This area is a combination of tile and carpeted space with a reception counter height at 1070mm. Entrance doors are visible by the receptionist who also monitors front and rear entrance security cameras.

Production Offices

Production Office A, is a carpeted area with level entrance and clear width opening of 820mm.

Production Office B, has an entrance door 960mm clear width opening with doorknob at 1100mm. Production Office B, could always be used as an alternative, should someone be unable to negotiate other areas.

Production Office C, has a 760mm width door with doorknob at 1100mmm.

Art Department

This carpeted area has double entrance doors each with a 780mm width.

Foley Sound Stage

This production studio has an entrance door width of 760mm with a 170mm carpeted step with contrasting nosing.

Staff Room - Kookaburra Cafe

The Kookaburra Cafe is a large area with vinyl floors. The western exit doors are level and open outward to a covered paved area.

Wardrobe 1

Wardrobe 1, has an entrance door off northern passage opening inward and is 760mm wide.  Doorknob is at 780mm.

Wardrobe 2

Wardrobe 2, has two entrance doors. The eastern door is 780mm with doorknob at 1070mm. The more western entrance door is only 720mm wide.

Edit Suites

Edit Suite 1 is a carpeted area with double entrance doors with a 1200mm clear width. 

All five Edit Suites have level entrances with 780mm clear door widths. 

6.  CONCLUSION

The South Australian Film Corporation has a history of employing people with disabilities and in producing films dealing with the issue of disability.  The DDA Review process revealed that the SAFC services have no systemic discriminatory practices. 

The risk of DDA complaints being lodged is considered unlikely given the present funding role of the Corporation and its minimal contact with the general public.  Because the uncertainty regarding SAFC current premises, the complaints based nature of the DDA legislation will be used as a major strategy in determining some priorities for the removal of barriers.

There are however barriers to people with vision impairments in regard to staircases and the lack of accessible toilet facilities for those using wheelchairs which should be addressed as soon as possible as well as issues relating to the equity of egress for people with disabilities during evacuation.

It is recommended that this DDA Action Plan be reviewed in five years’ time to reassess issues identified in the light of future decisions regarding the premises.



ADMINISTRATION

     
 

•          Ensure & monitor job advertisements are based on equal employment opportunities

•          Ensure services are available to all

•          Develop strategies to ensure that alternative arrangements are in place where facilities are unable to provide equitable access

•          Develop, promulgate and practice evacuation strategies, including provisions for people with disabilities

H

H

H

H

   

Carparking

     
 

•          Provide raised and ground-signed disability parking bay (3.2m wide) at the first northern end position of the western Lumiere Lane carparking area.

H

   

Entrances

     

Main Northern Entrance- Butler Drive

•          Reduce pressure required to open main entrance door

•          In the long term, re-design the main entrance and provide level access path to link with the visitor carpark disability bay.  A new level entrance should include accessible after hour and security control systems, pole mounted a metre from entrance and at a height between 900 - 1100mm.

H

M

   

North-eastern Entrance - Butler Drive

•          Pole mount security controls 1m from entrance at a height between 900 - 1100mm.

L

   

North-western Entrance - Lumiere Lane

•          Provide kerb ramp access to portico brick paved entrance area.

•          Pole mount security controls 1m from entrance at a height between 900 - 1100mm.

M

L

   

ISSUE

STRATEGY

PRIORITY

COST

RESPONSIBILITY

COMMENTS

South-western Entrance - Lumiere Lane

•          Pole mount security controls 1m from entrance at a height between 900 - 1100mm.

L

   

South-eastern Rear Entrance

•          Provide level entrance

L

   

North-eastern Rear Entrance

•          Develop management processes for alternative access procedures

H

   

Sound Stage 1 & 2 Entrances

•          No action required

    

Staircases

     
 

•          Develop management policy for providing alternative office and meeting accommodation when required by users with mobility impairments.

•          Provide tactile ground surface indicators (TGSIs) at the entrance and landings of all staircases.

•          Ensure all stair steps have firm contrasted step nosings

•          Provide second handrail where necessary

•          Improve stair lighting.

H

H

H

H

H

   

Eastern Staircase

•          Provide firm contrasted nosings

•          Provide a second handrail

•          Improve lighting

H

H

H

   

Western Staircase

•          Provide firm contrasted step nosings

•          Provide a second handrail

•          Improve lighting

H

H

H

   

Edit Area Stairs

•          Provide contrasting step nosings

H

   

Toilets

     

North-eastern Male Toilet

•          Contrast step nosings at entrance

•          Provide grab rail in first toilet cubicle

•          Reduce swing force on entry door

H

M

H

   

North-eastern Female Toilet

•          Contrast step nosings at entrance

•          Provide grab rail in first toilet cubicle

•          Reduce swing force on entry door

H

M

H

   

North-western Male Toilet

•          Contrast step nosings at entrance

•          Reduce swing force on entry doors

H

H

   

North-western Female Toilet

•          Provide unisex accessible facility in current rest room

•          An alternative rest room within current vacant areas would need to be provided if current room is converted into a unisex toilet

•          Reduce swing force on entry door

M

M

H

   

Theatres & other areas

     
 

•          Provide alternative arrangements if necessary.

H